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  • Mon-Fri 9am-6pm
  • Sat. 10am-2pm
  • Sun. Closed

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  • Mon-Fri 9am-5pm
  • Sat-Sun Closed
Indiana customers can call us at 800-946-6382
Helpful Hint!

Internet connection problem?

  • Power off your modem/router for 30 seconds, then turn it back on
  • Feel free to contact us
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How can I setup my own wireless router?

Wireless routers are a great way to network your home quickly and efficiently. However, there are many different routers on the market, and each is different in terms of what it can do and how it is set up. Contact the manufacturer of your wireless router for the most accurate information.

If you do not have a block of static IP addresses assigned to you (about 99% of residential customers), set your wireless router to obtain an IP address automatically.  This will force it to request an IP address automatically from our DSL modem and allow it to connect.  If you are still unable to connect at that point, your wireless router may be handing out the same IP addresses as the DSL modem, which causes a serious conflict.  Try modifying the LAN IP addresses that your wireless router hands out (if it's 192.168.1.1, change it to 192.168.2.1 or 192.168.3.1) and see if that resolves the problem.

If you do have static IP addresses, simply assign one of the available IP addresses to it and it should connect up just fine.

Our DSL modems do all of the authentication and negotiation with our servers, so your router does -not- need to try and authenticate to us to try and connect.  We do this to try and make implimenting equipment on your end as easy as possible.

Note: If you're adding wireless into your network, always remember to secure it.  If you leave your network open it is incredibly easy for someone you don't know to come along and connect to your network.

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